MOOCs at ERAU

mooc

What I didn’t add on my Facebook is that none other than YOURS TRULY will be developing the October MOOC for ERAU! Yippee skippy! I learn all about it tomorrow! Select the image above to learn more!

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In OTHER awesome news…the WAVE OF THE FUTURE IS HERE LADIES AND GENTS!

like love

DID YOU SEE?? THEY DID IT!!! THEY ACTUALLY DID IT!!! Our world is changing, folks. After so long of just being able to Like a status, FACEBOOK unleashed new emotions! We’ve got Like, Love, Haha, Wow, Sad, and Angry! I can’t even contain myself! This is incredible!

Okay, am I overreacting? I think not. The Like Button is a house hold term and phrase.

Did you like my photo?
Did you see ____liked it?
I just unliked and liked this again because I like it so much!

The controversy I am afraid of is the like vs love icon. Is someone going to have a hissy fit because their boyfriend only liked their photo and didn’t love it? Just imagine the controversy. I’ll just sit back with my popcorn and watch =)

Fads in E-Learning: Microlearning

digitalchalk-what-is-micro-learningWhile reading Jennifer Yaros’ new post, it lead me to Microlearning: The e-Learning method taking off around the world. Then, I thought about my own learning and experiences.

I am a trivia geek. My husband and I can slay anyone in trivia matches. Not to mention I’m gaining momentum in the iOS app, Trivia Crack. I love learning useless (IMHO – not so useless) facts. I love nonfiction ANYTHING and thrive on the humanities and science as a way to live my life passionately. I take a lot of the knowledge that I possess and develop common sense strategies and answers for questions that pertain to any subject. I find that this way of info-blasting and microlearning has helped my overall well-rounded knowledge.

Microlearning defines learning experiences that are much briefer than a traditional course – referring to relatively small learning units and short-term learning activities.

Chunk it UP & dice it! Pick out only the best pieces and roll with it!

This idea of spewing a ton of information in a short amount of time has been going on for a few years now. Headings and subheadings with small paragraphs that get to the nitty-gritty are my most favorite pieces of literature, and I hope this style never goes away. I LOVE the idea of reading “just the facts” without any lingering details (which are always completely unnecessary). But that’s how my brain works! My brain does not have time or energy for fluff.

I have a feeling, though, that the world will eliminate the fluff sooner or later.

So, let’s transition from Buzzfeed-esque articles to e-Learning. Microlearning is a blast of information in a short amount of time. Isn’t that what everyone is given? A short amount of time? How appropriate! Translate this idea to all 9-5 job situations: “Mr. So-and-so…I need you to learn this new aspect of your job by yesterday. Can you do that for me? That’d be grreeaaatt.”

Yeah well, yesterday already happened…so…

From a business perspective, almost 90% of associations use some form of technology to enable or enhance learning and more than half (52.8%) of associations that use technology for learning have increased their organisation’s net revenue from educational offerings.

Fewer than a third (31.5%) of organisations that report using technology for learning say they use technology to repeat, reinforce, or sustain learning after participants complete an educational product or service. Another 29.4% say they plan to in the coming year.

Close to 50% of organisations integrate the data they collect in their learning technology platforms with the data from other technology platforms they use.

Well, I’m happy. Why? I am not too sure microlearning is just a fad- it could be here to stay!

#Trends in #elearning

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Universities won’t survive. The future is outside the traditional campus, outside the traditional classroom. Distance learning is coming on fast.” – Peter Drucker, 1997

The article below is a great read. A lot of the trends listed are obvious, but the reasons behind them dig deep into that quote. Wow, 1997. I was just venturing into second grade at that point. Little did my brain know that my career would engage in the wild and crazy future of education.

IF, and only IF universities do not survive, what does that mean for the world as we know it? Forget freshman year on campus and Leadership Safari – I did not build my social skills from those instances.

My main focus and worry is the lack of human-to-human interaction. If universities do not survive, what does that mean for K-12 education? We are already glued to our electronic devices and human communication is dwindling- where do we go from here? Is this a world we want to be a part of 20 years from now? 50 years?

All these trends are great and will keep a nice cash flow in my bank account, but that quote is something to really think about. That means that it is OUR job as IDDers to incorporate as MUCH human interaction as possible.

How? What is the best method of including human interaction in e-learning courses? Do you think the quote is valid? Why haven’t universities crashed and burned yet? Will it ever?

The following article was created for my virtual presentation “Global Trends in the eLearning Industry” at the International Congress on eLearning 2013 organized by the Philippine eLearning Society.

Source: Future eLearning Trends and Technologies in the Global eLearning Industry

Opinion: How Do We Know What They Know?

In my past life, I was a middle school math teacher. As I am still in the field of education, I keep my experiences close to my heart as I have witnessed the issues multiple families are now experiencing.

Your children are coming home with good grades and they don’t know anything. Okay maybe they know something, but not everything on that assignment sheet – I promise you.

Math is the easiest to fake since K-8 is all about the repetition of memorizing procedures and 9-12 takes those memorized procedures are the backbone of more memorized procedures. I did not understand the “why” and the “how” of math until my undergrad. I made up rhymes and songs to get myself through high school Calculus because there was no tangible sense to the subject.

I was one of those students where memorization and little tricks came easy to me, so I decided to major in mathematics for my undergrad. I liked math and I was good at it. Yeah, I was good at memorizing and making sense of it all! Was I truly learning? Could I apply my skills to real world situations? How many word problems were on assessments or included for homework? Hardly any. Why? Because my teachers didn’t know how to explain applicable math in the real world either.

I could go on for days about how our education system is royally messed up, but I’m here to talk about something a little bit different. Once I started my undergrad I had incredible professors that taught me how to study the learning process.

The article, Knowing What Students Know: The Power of Documentation -By Angela Stockman & John T. McCrann describes the advantages to study the learning process by documentation and even includes 8 Steps in a Recursive Process to aid in the shift. 

Hilda Borko, Brian Stecher, and Karin Kuffner  suggest that when scientists want to study the earth’s crust or the ocean floor, they don’t require our planet to stop spinning in order to produce lab samples. Instead, they simply scoop up what they need in order to examine it. Likening learners to planets and teachers to scientists, Borko, Stecher, and Kuffner challenge us to assess learning in process through the use of scoop notebooks rather than disrupting it in order to test. Much can be learned about the power of documentation from their work.

How do you know what your students know? This article raises some questions- how is this possible in our system of underpaid teachers who are highly skilled, yet bogged down by the ever demanding standardized tests. Oh, and teaching math, among other subjects, in the most ridiculous way possible?

So now, is higher education any different? I am so fortunate that the SME that I am working with is an incredible person: she loves project-based learning and structures her learning outcomes and objectives to meet those requirements. In their graduate courses, students create something that is valuable to the career they want.

As I’m reading these steps from the article, wouldn’t it be amazing if there was time to meet with students to mull over the documentation and feedback? What if we could truly sit down with our students and display, interpret, and theorize the evidence?  Students need feedback. They need relevant and meaningful goals towards learning something new is a crucial step to this process just as making the learning process as real as possible. When students are involved in the way they learn, where their struggles and strengths lie, they will be more apt to actually learning instead of regurgitating information that is completely meaningless!

My favorite:

Good scientists know that the findings from their documentation work serve as catalysts for different and perhaps deeper investigations far more often than they provide clear answers. Similarly, great teachers use what they learn from their documentation efforts in service to students, but more importantly, they use their discoveries to define what they want or need to learn next. This renewed commitment to learning, sharing, theorizing, testing, and relearning often ignites enthusiasm, inspiring them to seek company among professionals who share their passion for this work.